On the coast, up the hill, some are here, some are gone

Today, we returned back to Rangitoto Wharf and continued on from yesterday. The surveyed bach sites ranged from existing dwellings to demolished sites and were located along the coastal track and tucked amongst the trees inland. Once neatly manicured tracks are now heavily disguised with overgrown vegetation. After bashing your way through the bush, a clearing where a building once stood proud, can be seen.

An existing inland bach, Rangitoto Wharf

An existing inland bach, Rangitoto Wharf

An inland bach site which has been demolished, Rangitoto Wharf

An inland bach site which has been demolished, Rangitoto Wharf

When looking for a demolished bach site, you need to look for a large clearing amongst the trees, usually flat and a stone lined pathway leading to the site. Once at the site you can expect to find cultural remains, such as, water tanks, outhouses (long drops), concrete foundations, corrugated iron, fibrolite (asbestos-cement sheeting), ceramics, window glass and a bottle dump. We may think the baches no longer remain but cultural features still remind us of a holiday retreat. As for archaeology, so much could be learned about the behaviour of bach residents, but this will have to be sidelined for a future project! /KB

Kurt at an existing coastal bach with an associated boat ramp, Rangitoto Wharf

Kurt at an existing coastal bach with an associated boat ramp, Rangitoto Wharf

The view from a demolished coastal bach at Rangitoto Wharf

The view from a demolished coastal bach at Rangitoto Wharf

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